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ADVISORY STRUCTURE POLICY PAPER:

A PROPOSED POLICY FRAMEWORK

October 1, 1998

 

table of contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PART I - PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND

1. PURPOSE

2. INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND

3. CURRENT ADVISORY STRUCTURES

3.1 British Columbia

3.2 Other Canadian Jursidictions

4. ADVISORY STRUCTURE CONSULTATION QUESTIONS

PART II - WHAT ITAC HEARD FROM THE CONSULTATION

5. ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

6. RESPONSE TO THE THREE ITAC QUESTIONS

6.1 Terms of Reference

6.2 Composition

6.3 Structure

PART III - ITAC’S RESPONSE

7. PROPOSED ITAC ADVISORY STRUCTURE POLICY

7.1 Purpose and Scope of the Advisory Structure

7.2 Principles

7.3 Goals/Objectives

7.4 Roles and Responsibilities

7.5 Proposed Structure

7.5.1 Common Principles - All ITAC Advisory Structures

7.5.2 ITAC Advisory Structure

7.5.3 Advisory Structure Schematic

7.6 Accountability and Performance Indicators

8. NEXT STEPS

8.1 Implementation Strategy

APPENDICES

Appendix I - Regional Consultation Meeting Schedule

Appendix II - What ITAC Heard from the Consultation


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Board members and staff of the Industry Training and Apprenticeship Commission (ITAC) conducted an extensive province-wide consultation in the Spring of 1998 to solicit input from interested parties on the terms of reference, composition and structure of a new ITAC advisory structure.

The paper contains three main sections. Part I describes the purpose of the policy paper, provides background information regarding ITAC’s authority vis-�-vis advisory structures, highlights current advisory structures in BC and other Canadian jurisdictions and summarizes the key questions asked. Part II and Appendix II contain a description of what ITAC heard during the consultation at the regional and provincial meetings, from written submissions and from staff; it summarizes the common themes, issues and challenges and the overall responses to the questions posed. Part III contains the proposed ITAC advisory structure policy including purpose and scope, principles, goals and objectives, roles and responsibilities, the actual structure, accountability and performance indicators and next steps.

Developing and implementing an enhanced ITAC advisory structure will be challenging. The proposed structure must be industry-driven, meet the requirements of the Industry Training and Apprenticeship Act and be consistent with ITAC’s mandate and strategic direction. The proposed structure must in large measure reflect the many and varied recommendations received from hundreds of interested parties. In addition, consideration has to be given to the ability of ITAC to resource such a structure.

The consultation meetings and written submissions identified several key issues or challenges to an effective and efficient ITAC advisory structure, including:

The need for both strategic-level and technical advice.

The need to reconcile international, national, provincial, regional, sectoral, trade and demographic interests.

The need for effective administration and processes.

A recognition by all stakeholders of significant resource constraints.

Divergent interests (union and non-union labour and management; sector specific and/or trade specific representation; regional and/or provincial participation).

No "cookie cutter" model -- the need to reflect regional, sectoral and trade/occupational differences.

The need for enhanced communications and linkages.

Ensuring the participation of equity-seeking organizations and individuals.

How to get good involvement of small business, especially at the regional level.

Section 7 describes the proposed ITAC advisory structure policy. This proposed advisory structure will require clear goals and objectives against which performance indicators can be developed to periodically evaluate the structure. The goals are as follows:

to develop a cohesive, integrated advisory structure that helps achieve ITAC’s mandate and strategic directions;

to broaden the nature, type and scope of advice to the ITAC Board and staff;

to automate information and communications between ITAC and the components of its advisory structure;

to link broad strategic policy advice with ITAC’s strategic and budget planning processes; and

to implement new terms of reference, appointment process, and reporting amongst partners.

What ITAC heard and believes it needs are two types of advice and recommendations, particularly from business and labour: "strategic policy level advice" and "technical, operational policy advice". To obtain this advice, ITAC is proposing the following:

It proposes that there be Trade or Occupation Advisory Groups and that over time a smaller number of committees than the current number of trade advisory committees be developed by combining trades/occupations with commonalities.

It proposes an ITAC Chairs Advisory Group to link cross trade/occupation and sector issues and to link with ITAC staff on key issues.

It maintains the existing College Program Advisory Committee structure, but with clear linkages, common membership and other enhancements with the express requirement for ITAC to work with them in determining the most appropriate advisory linkages.

It proposes the creation of an ITAC planning calendar regarding ITAC’s need for advice and consultation with its stakeholders on an ad hoc and regular basis.

It recognizes that ITAC’s enhanced advisory structure will evolve over time and will be subject to a review process after three years to determine the efficacy of the enhanced ITAC Advisory Structure.

Provision of strategic advice will be through: an ITAC Integrated Advisory Planning Framework; ITAC Industry Advisory Groups; and Regional Industry Advisory Consultations.

ITAC Integrated Advisory Planning Framework - Will assist ITAC in determining and setting its priorities in consultation with its partners -- business, labour, education and training providers, equity seeking individuals and organizations. This integrated advisory structure will include the use of focus groups, electronic communications, questionnaires, annual ITAC advisory forums and other consultations, and will not be limited to "committees" per se.

ITAC Industry Advisory Groups - Will provide strategic policy advice to ITAC on short and long term industry training needs and strategies and will monitor and respond to ITAC on issues that may impact one’s industry. ITAC will consult with industry representatives on the establishment of these groups to ensure, where possible, that membership on the groups reflects ITAC industry-driven nature and partnership model of business and labour representation. However, nominations, appointments and resources for these groups will be managed by industry and not by ITAC. Recommendations and/or advice from these groups will be directed to ITAC. The paper describes the terms of reference, composition and nomination process, operation and staff role regarding the ITAC Industry Advisory Groups in more detail.

Regional Industry Advisory Consultations - ITAC heard during the consultation from many small businesses, industry groups and institutional staff and partners that it must have a mechanism for obtaining regional industry advice. Although regional industry representation will be encouraged in all of ITAC’s advisory groups, broader input will occur by regional industry advisory consultations. ITAC will take the lead in calling these consultations and will resource them when held. The consultations will be inclusive of all British Columbians with an interest in industry training and apprenticeship.

ITAC Structure

Provision of technical, operational advice will be through: the Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups; the Chairs’ Advisory Group; and Program Advisory Committees.

Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups - Over time, where possible and feasible, Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups will be consolidated with a view to reducing the current number of existing Trade Advisory Committees. These groups will provide technical and operational advice to ITAC.

The members of these groups will be composed of at least 50 per cent representation from business and labour. Other members may include program advisory committee members, education, private training, under-represented groups, public agency representatives and possibly apprentices/trainees. Nominations will be managed by ITAC and submitted to the CEO.

The Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups will meet as a whole less frequently in person, i.e. annual 2 day meeting when needed. This will not preclude the need for sub-committee meetings on task-specific projects and the use of non-traditional communication (e.g. conference calls, fax, etc.).

Establishment of Chairs’ Advisory Group - Will provide operational and common technical and broad strategic policy advice to ITAC through the ITAC CEO. The group will be composed of 10 Trade/Occupation Advisory Group Chairs who will be appointed by the ITAC CEO. The Group will be required to resource itself. The existing TAC Chair’s Committee will continue to provide advice to ITAC on an interim basis until implementation of the new advisory structure is complete.

College and Institute Program Advisory Committees - Will provide advice to ITAC and communicate with ITAC on programs it funds. The composition, nomination process and operation of PACs will be determined once the college/institutes, MAETT and ITAC have determined the most appropriate linkages. In the meantime, a PAC representative will be appointed to the appropriate Trade/Occupation Advisory Group and vice a versa.

ITAC staff will manage the advisory process by providing analysis and research, and make recommendations on policy and technical/operational issues to the CEO, the Board and/or its standing committees. Many of the proposed mechanisms will be supported by the partners, not ITAC.

Implementation and next steps will be considered once feedback is received from the many stakeholders. Phased implementation is expected to occur early in 1999.


PART I - PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND.......

1. PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy paper is two-fold:

to summarize what the Board of the Industry Training and Apprenticeship Commission (ITAC) has heard at 15 consultation meetings, through 25 written submissions and from staff regarding the structure, terms of reference and composition of the Commission’s advisory structure; and

to provide a proposed advisory structure policy with which to obtain feedback from stakeholders.

2. INTRODUCTION/ BACKGROUND

The Industry Training and Apprenticeship Commission, under the authority of the Industry Training and Apprenticeship Act, "may establish an advisory committee to provide advice and recommendations with respect to one or more aspects of the Commission’s mandate."

Within the parameters of the Act—particularly the Commission’s mandate and available resources—the Commission needs to work with existing Trade Advisory Committees (TACs), College Program Advisory Committees (PACs), other education representatives, other industry representatives, representatives of under-represented groups, and government to develop an effective and efficient advisory structure.

During the months of April-June this year, the ITAC Board held 10 regional meetings throughout the province, 5 provincial meetings with constituency groups that had a specific interest in participating in the consultation process and received 25 written submissions.

The Commission has considered as part of this process the recommendations of the Minister’s Committee on Entry Level Trades Training and Apprenticeship in its final report on governance (February, 1997). Its recommendations on advisory committees were as follows:

That the ITAC be given the authority in the legislation to establish industry/trade advisory committees, including sector-focused committees if deemed appropriate. These committees would have a broad mandate to:

provide labour market information/intelligence;

provide advice on industry training needs and priorities;

provide advice on designation of trades and occupations;

define training outcomes and industry standards for trades/occupations, including curriculum and examinations;

assess the quality of training outcomes and standards;

identify new trades/occupations;

identify required equipment for training and assist in procuring this equipment for training institutions;

advocate for the ITAC and all training operating under the ITAC umbrella;

assist training programs to obtain practical experience opportunities for students and instructors;

procure bursary and scholarship support; and

assist in marketing occupational opportunities to youth.

That industry/trade advisory committees report to ITAC or its Standing or Executive Committees as established by decision of the ITAC.

That the industry/trade advisory committees be knowledgeable of industry training and apprenticeship, and be inclusive of the education/training community.

ITAC requires an advisory structure that mirrors its new mandate and scope of responsibilities and will require advice on strategic matters as well as operational issues.

3. CURRENT ADVISORY STRUCTURES

3.1 British Columbia

In BC, there are 65 Trade Advisory Committees (TACs), numerous college and institute Program Advisory Committees (PACs), articulation committees for most trade areas and Secondary School Apprenticeship steering committees and consortia that exist throughout the province. The degree to which there are activities and interrelationships between these entities vary by region and by trade area.

Existing Trade Advisory Committees. Trade Advisory Committees currently provide advice to ITAC about industry requirements and standards needed to provide fully qualified and skilled tradespersons in BC in the following areas:

definition, description and name of apprenticeable trades and occupations.

qualifications for entry into apprenticeship.

qualifications and examinations for certification in the trade or occupation.

the term of apprenticeship.

the content of on-the-job and in-school training for apprentices, including length of training.

the journeyperson updating requirements of the trade or occupation.

new innovative or alternate methods of delivering apprenticeship training.

any other matters as requested by ITAC.

Existing College/Institute Program Advisory Committees. Program Advisory Committees (PACs) are referenced in the Colleges and Institutes Act, Part 4, Section 19 (1) c): A board must do the following: make bylaws under subsection (5) (e) to establish a program advisory committee, which must include faculty member, educational administrator and student representation.

PACs are used in vocational and career technical programs in BC colleges/institutes (including ELTT programs) to make recommendations to the college/institute Directors of Instruction in matters relating to the development and evaluation of programs, curricula and services. PACs cannot commit the institution financially or make policy decisions.

The terms of reference of PACs includes: assist with the definition of program objectives, recommend changes to course content and curriculum development, and advise on the criteria for length of program and requirements for admission; advise the college regarding instructional materials, shop equipment used in the program of study, necessary upgrading programs and labour market changes which have an impact on programs; serve as a communication between the college and industry; assist in the recruitment and selection of instructors and in recruiting and placing qualified graduates in jobs, etc.

Some college/institute boards specify in their bylaws that the education council shall serve as the program advisory council. The colleges/institutes are not compelled to establish program advisory committees. The Act is silent on the need for individual program advisory committees for each program.

Provincial Articulation Committees. There are 67 Provincial Articulation Committees of which about 15 committees relate to the trades. The committees operate under the aegis of the BC Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT). The goals of the committees are to: aid in the process of inter-institutional transfer credit; promote course equivalency; exchange information and enhance cooperation and coordination among those providing instruction in a given area of study; facilitate transfer of students from one educational institution to another, etc. Membership includes representation from: public colleges, institutes and universities which offer instruction, secondary school system, private institutions, relevant associations, MAETT program coordinators and the BCCAT administrator who acts as a non-voting resource person.

3.2 Other Canadian Jurisdictions

Most provinces and territories in Canada have provincial apprenticeship or advisory committees (PACs) in each trade or group of trades. Some jurisdictions like Alberta and Ontario have local apprenticeship committees (LACs) in regions where there is a significant amount of training and sufficient interest on the part of industry. A balance of employer and employee interests is maintained on the PACs and LACs.

In Ontario, the roles and responsibilities of PACs and LACs are under review to determine what aspects of apprenticeship training might benefit from increased industry influence and involvement. PACs are expected to expand their roles in promoting apprenticeship training and developing training standards.

PACs are generally appointed by the provincial apprenticeship board for each designated trade or related group of trades. These committees advise and report to the provincial apprenticeship board and in some jurisdictions, for example Manitoba, have the authority to do so in the designation of trades, compulsory trades, training and upgrading standards, qualifications and experience for certification and trade regulations.

The Provincial Apprenticeship Board in Saskatchewan is based upon a partnership among employers, employees, training institutions and government. A network of industry representatives in the form of Trade Advisory Boards (TABs) is organized for each designated trade.

In New Brunswick, PACs are formed for each occupation or group of allied occupations. Steps are being taken to reorganize these committees based on industry sectors. LACS are formed in regions of the province where a need exists and business and labour are represented equally on these committees.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, the provincial apprenticeship board is currently reviewing its advisory structure to consolidate its advisory committees into sector committees where possible. Terms of reference for Sectoral Committees and Occupational Task Groups have been approved and are expected to be implemented in the fall/winter of 1998/99. In Quebec, the identification of training needs of employees is done through sectoral committees.

The Apprenticeship Training Division, through the Nova Scotia Community College Program Advisory Committees, maintains close ties with the industrial sector. These committees provide advice on technical training outcomes, equipment requirements and delivery methods.

In Prince Edward Island, greater partnership arrangements have been identified as necessary given the declining level of public funding and the inability of apprentices to obtain a variety of work experience on-the-job. It has been suggested that trade advisory committees be established in each trade to make recommendations on: the scope of the trade; the level of knowledge and skill required; the level of flexibility required to meet individual needs; the alignment of in-school training with job sites; and, funding arrangements required to match in-school training.

4. ADVISORY STRUCTURE CONSULTATION QUESTIONS

In its consultation discussion paper, ITAC asked stakeholders three basic questions:

1. What should the terms of reference be for ITAC advisory committees?

2. What should be the composition of ITAC’s advisory committees?

3. How should ITAC advisory committees be structured?

Part II of this paper summarizes what ITAC heard in response to these questions during the consultation process.


PART II - WHAT ITAC HEARD FROM THE CONSULTATION.......

Input received at regional and provincial meetings and from written submissions is synthesized in Appendix II.

5. Issues and Challenges

In summary, the consultation meetings and written submissions identified several key issues or challenges to an effective and efficient ITAC advisory structure:

The need for both experienced and new members.

The need for both strategic-level and technical advice.

The need to reconcile international, national, provincial, regional, sectoral, trade and demographic interests.

The need for effective administration and processes.

The need to balance competing priorities and respect a wide range of diverse responses.

A recognition by all stakeholders of significant resource constraints.

Divergent interests (union and non-union labour and management; sector specific and/or trade specific representation; regional and/or provincial participation).

No "cookie cutter" model.

The need for enhanced communications and linkages.

Advisory role versus decision making authority.

Moving from an established system to an enhanced advisory structure that reflects ITAC’s mandate.

In the case of equity seeking organizations and individuals, considering how and who could most effectively sit on an standing committee in a representative and meaningful way.

How to get good involvement of small business, especially at the regional level, and link all of the stakeholders effectively and efficiently without multiple committees or meetings.

6. RESPONSE TO THE THREE ITAC QUESTIONS

The following section is an amalgam of comments from all stakeholders organized according to the three basic questions ITAC asked stakeholders on the terms of reference, composition and structure of its advisory committees.

6.1 Terms of Reference

Role of advisory committees. The majority of respondents indicated that advisory committees should act as advisors to the Board to: set standards, review curriculum for uniformity of content and make recommendations on entry level trades training (ELTT). ITAC should provide direction, set objectives and assign tasks to advisory committees.

Expanding existing trades or developing new trades. ITAC needs to have labour market analysis done and labour market intelligence collected before expanding existing trades or developing new ones. There was a general concern about the resources available to do these activities with reduced budgets and bare-boned staffing levels. The system is stretched already and concern was expressed about taking on more new work when there are existing trades that need review. There is a need to review the changes that have occurred in the trades and the need for either revised curricula or establishment of new trades to replace the dated trades. This would allow the trades training system time to "catch-up" with the world of work. Other comments included funding alternatives such as partial wage funding, tax incentives and more flexible delivery of apprenticeship technical training.

Promoting and facilitating access to industry training and apprenticeship for under-represented group members. There was a wide variety of responses to this question. A few indicated that nothing needed to be done but the majority of participants recognized that the system has been closed and there is a need to reflect the reality of the labour market and to make the system more accessible.

A common suggestion was to begin a promotional campaign aimed at all under-represented groups and implemented through the Knowledge Network, Aboriginal media and role models. Apprenticeship needs to be promoted at the high schools, as well as through the use of association newsletters and other sources of community outreach. Greater flexibility in training and in the trades would possibly enable more employers and trades people to participate in apprenticeship. Tracking the number of under-represented groups that are hired and their success stories would provide useful statistical information.

Building on the strengths of the existing committees and improving on the efficiency and effectiveness of the past. Some participants focused on the number of advisory committees, the number of meetings held per year and the lines of communication. There was some consensus to reduce the number of advisory committees and to hold half day meetings more often, in addition to annual meetings between the ITAC Board and the advisory committees. There was general concern over the lack of funding for members to attend meetings and for the reduction of staff support in ITAC.

Communication was a key issue during the consultation and several ideas were generated to help improve links within advisory committees, between advisory committees, between advisory committees and their constituency groups, and between advisory committees and ITAC. A large majority of the participants felt that the Internet should be used to publish: minutes of meetings, advisory committee membership and meeting schedules, general statistics on ELTT and under-represented groups, and labour market information. Another popular communication tool was the use of email, conference calls either by video or telephone and the use of sub-committees.

Authority of advisory committee. Attendees felt that the committees should act in an advisory capacity to the ITAC Board. Many people agreed that once advisory committee recommendations were put forward to the Board, they should be considered in a timely manner.

6.2 Composition

Criteria and process for appointments to advisory committees. When stakeholders were asked what the criteria and process for appointments to the advisory committees should be, it evoked a number of comments and recommendations; however, the main focus was on the representation of the current Trade Advisory Committees.

Many people felt that there needs to be more regional representation on the advisory committees as it is common to have the majority of participants from the Lower Mainland. There also was a large push for more small employers to be active members, however, funding for these people to attend was a concern.

There is a need to ensure that each ITAC advisory committee includes representatives from both large and small industry, as well as the full range of industry sectors which use a trade. This is key to ensure that as industry modifies standards, that training standards are updated.

Generally, it was suggested that membership should include:

An ITAC Coordinator or Counsellor representative (perhaps in an ex-officio, non-voting capacity);

College and K-12 representative;

Apprentices;

Those with technical expertise and knowledge of the trades;

Industry representatives with a proven track record of training apprentices; and,

Staff to provide summaries of the meetings.

At the same time, concern was also expressed that ITAC not make the advisory committee too big and cumbersome.

There was concern that some committees need more of an active participation by employer representatives; there is a need to have the committee size reflective of the industry; and there needs to be more representation from management in some case.

Membership principles. Comments included the need to: leave politics out of the meetings; have the advisory committees and its members accountable to ITAC; have strong leadership and unbiased members; have a positive attitude towards inclusiveness of under-represented labour force groups; and be team oriented and open to sharing information.

Demographic and regional diversity on ITAC advisory committees. The following suggestions were made:

hold regional meetings;

standardize regional college programs and course content so that there would not be so much regional variance; and,

establish industry sector advisory committees (e.g. construction, heavy industry, forestry, etc.) in addition to trade-specific (e.g. electrical, millwright, welder etc.) committees as with the existing TACs and PACs.

Duration of appointment to committees. This topic resulted in diverse opinion, ranging from a two to five year minimum term. Additional comments included the need for review at the end of the term, orientation sessions for new members, terms should be staggered and members who miss more than two meetings should be required to step down. There was no common suggestion for the maximum term and there were those who thought meetings should be held twice a year, others, four times a year.

6.3 Structure

There was few direct responses to the specific questions regarding structure and linkages; however, some of the most common suggestions are outlined below.

Links between advisory committees and the ITAC Board and its Standing Committees and Task Groups. The Board needs to act as a support (provide guidance and direction) to the advisory committees and it needs to implement recommendations in a timely manner. Two-way communication and clear reporting relationships are needed. Linkages with advisory committees should be through the Chief Executive Officer or by having Board members sit on advisory committees.

Trade, sectoral and regional priorities. There was a general theme that sectoral advice on advisory committees would be beneficial. Business and labour must be represented on sectoral committees. Some groups stated that their industry interests were not being adequately served by trade-specific advisory committees; other groups believed that the trade-specific committees reflect the reality that many occupations cut across industry sectors and therefore are necessary to ensure coordination and breadth of input.

Links with ITAC advisory committees and other stakeholder groups and members of under-represented groups. There is a need to link employers with TACs, colleges with trades, and ITAC Counsellors with colleges. Stakeholders and members of equity seeking groups should be included in all information mail-outs, update articles could be written for stakeholder group newsletters and information sharing meetings could be held on a semi-regular basis.

Links with ITAC, existing Trade Advisory Committees and other industry training and apprenticeship Advisory Committees. A few participants suggested that there be one common person to sit on the Articulation Committee, the PACs and the TACs to act as a common link. Industry Training and Apprenticeship Counsellors are natural links as they are in touch with the trades and sit on advisory committees.

Draft 4


PART III - ITAC’S RESPONSE….

7. PROPOSED ITAC ADVISORY STRUCTURE POLICY

Introduction

The ITAC advisory structure needs to be industry-driven and meet the requirements of the Industry Training and Apprenticeship Act and the mandate and strategic direction of ITAC.

The new advisory structure should build on the strengths of the Commission’s existing advisory structures. However, ITAC heard from its stakeholders that the status quo is not an option.

ITAC’s dilemma in proposing an appropriate advisory structure is that with the addition of Entry Level Trades Training to its mandate, ITAC will require advice from a myriad of areas numbering in the hundreds. The proposed advisory structure is designed to provide ITAC with a smaller number of comprehensive, relevant and representative ways of soliciting and receiving advice. ITAC will always need to draw upon a broader set of expertise and supplement its limited time by calling on many others to provide advice and recommendations on strategic and operational policy and program issues. This can be achieved through various means including, but not limited to committees per se.

ITAC has to fundamentally reform how it does business, how it obtains industry advice, how it delivers its programs and how it organizes and funds itself. It must provide leadership and challenge itself and industry—both business and labour—and other stakeholders to create an advisory structure that is effective and efficient, and that can be supported and sustained by ITAC’s resources.

An important part of the ITAC’s role is to facilitate the four-cornered partnership and to find common ground by reconciling disparate interests and conflicting goals. As in many public policy arenas, it is largely a question of balancing priorities and interests and to align them with the policy goals of the system. This is clearly the case in considering an ITAC advisory policy framework. The Commission:

has heard that it must provide opportunities to regularly obtain advice from sectoral, regional, trade and demographic perspectives.

has to balance the priority of managing and supporting an effective advisory structure with the other priorities of the Commission when it allocates administrative resources;

has to distinguish between and balance the need for strategic, policy level advice and more concrete technical/educational level advice—both are essential and both need to be linked;

must in its advisory structure reflect a balance of support for existing trades with means for moving into new trades, occupations and emerging industries;

has to respect the interest of individual industries and institutions which have their own existing advisory structures; but it must also ensure that there are clear linkages, roles and responsibilities;

must do more to bring key industries—existing (e.g. Construction) and emerging (e.g. Knowledge-Based) industries into its advisory structure and planning and priority-setting; and

should rely on the assistance of its advisory structure to ensure that ITAC and the industry training and apprenticeship system does not become politicized.

There are currently 65 trade advisory committees that have historically been the backbone of the apprenticeship system. ITAC now requires an advisory structure for a broader industry training and apprenticeship system, and needs to clarify roles, streamline its advisory structure and enhance linkages. This change signals a need for an advisory structure that links similar trades and industry sectors and links trade or occupation-specific advisory structures with program advisory groups. The degree to which it changes is dependent on the partners, the resources available to support it and the degree of linkages amongst the diverse parts of the system.

ITAC has a small budget to support the administration of its many committees and needs to commit its resources to additional ways of communicating with its many partners and receiving advice from them—regional meetings, broader industry/sector groups and electronic communications through the use of the Internet (e.g. ITAC web site), email and other technologies.

ITAC’s proposed advisory structure policy should balance the need for change with a commitment to build on the strength of successful models, administratively simple structures and processes to reflect the limited resources available to support this initiative.

A major challenge for ITAC is how to build an effective, efficient, sustainable industry advisory structure that can be adequately managed and supported by ITAC staff. Its existing advisory structure is such that it already cannot be adequately supported; yet it will be difficult to introduce a new structure without requiring more staff involvement—not to mention as ITAC expands into new trades, occupations and industries which will require more advisory participation. ITAC will make changes in its own structure to improve this but this will be an evolving process.

The new ITAC advisory structure policy has to respond to the following needs:

A clear statement of roles and accountability for ensuring linkages are achieved among ITAC advisory structures (i.e. among industries, trades, regions, etc.) and the Board, committees and staff of ITAC.

Mechanisms for more effective advice provision from industry sectors to ITAC.

Effective communication within and among ITAC advisory structures and with the Board, committees and staff of ITAC.

Establishing an advisory structure that has the capacity to provide ITAC with strategic, policy level and technical/educational advice.

Reducing the need to rely solely on standing advisory "committees" through the use of technology and regular, broader-based consultation and communication mechanisms.

A recognition that more intensive industry advice is needed during the development and start-up of a program, after which annual or bi-annual review is sufficient.

A streamlined, more sustainable trade/occupation specific advisory structure.

Clear guidelines for nominating new committee members and selecting chairs.

A clear statement on the nature and scope of ITAC staff roles and responsibilities in supporting the advisory structure.

7.1 Purpose and Scope of the Advisory Structure

The responsibility for the stewardship of the BC industry training and apprenticeship system and ensuring that it meets high quality, industry-driven standards rests with ITAC, particularly its Board of Directors.

ITAC’s mandate is very broad and far reaching, involving approximately 150 trades and occupations and numerous programs. It is not realistic that adequate expertise is contained on the Board, no matter how effective it is. In order to meet its obligations under the Act, the ITAC Board seeks advice and recommendations from an advisory structure comprised of various industry sectors, trades and occupations, regions and demographic groups—each who have specialized knowledge, experience and interests related to their scope.

The overall purpose of the ITAC advisory structure is to:


provide strategic policy and technical advice—particularly from industry (business and labour)—to the ITAC Board and its committees and staff;

enhance communications and linkages among ITAC stakeholders and ITAC;

and be more inclusive of all British Columbians.

The scope of the ITAC advisory structure is:

industry-focused;

involving all ITAC programs (i.e. apprenticeship, ELTT, skills upgrading, Secondary School programs, etc.); and

involving the development of new programs as well as the review and renewal of existing programs, etc.

7.2 Principles

The following principles are reflected in the ITAC advisory policy framework and in how it should be implemented. The Commission’s advisory structure should be:

industry-driven and responsive.

flexible and inclusive—sectorally, regionally and demographically.

accessible to equity seeking individuals and organizations.

representative of ITAC’s broad mandate and four-cornered partnership model.

transparent, with well-defined contact points.

a network model comprised of effective linkages at the regional and provincial level.

effective, efficient and accountable in receiving, communicating and implementing industry advice and recommendations.

administratively efficient, cost-effective and requiring limited additional ITAC staff support.

maximizing the use of technology to facilitate communications and linkages between the partners.

non-partisan and providing strong leadership.

7.3 Goals/Objectives

The ITAC advisory structure requires clear goal statements against which performance indicators can be developed, in order to periodically evaluate the structure as part of the Commission’s accountability monitoring and reporting. The goals are as follows:

to develop a cohesive, integrated advisory structure that helps achieve ITAC’s mandate and strategic directions;

to broaden the nature, type and scope of advice to the ITAC Board and staff;

to automate information and communications between ITAC and the components of its advisory structure;

to link broad strategic policy advice with ITAC’s strategic and budget planning processes; and

to implement new terms of reference, appointment process, and reporting amongst partners.

7.4 Roles and Responsibilities

The proposed ITAC advisory structure will be based on a clear understanding and communication of roles.

1. ITAC Board and Standing Committees - The mandate, roles and authorities of the ITAC Board and standing committees are defined in its Act and bylaws. ITAC has a statutory and constituent responsibility to ensure that its policies, funding and practices are based on industry advice and recommendations. As steward of the industry training and apprenticeship system in BC, the ITAC Board is accountable for creating an effective, efficient and integrated training system. This starts with an effective, efficient and integrated advisory structure.

2. ITAC Staff - Led by the CEO, ITAC staff manage the critical role of analyzing and researching policy issues, defining options and making recommendations on such issues to the Board. They also do the same regarding operational and technical issues and making recommendations to the Executive of ITAC. In both cases, this staff work is based on careful consideration of input from the advisory structure and other sources. The CEO and staff will facilitate and expedite the process of getting industry recommendations/submissions to the Board and its committees as appropriate.

New ITAC staff policies and procedures need to reflect a proactive, leadership role with the advisory structure and advice to the ITAC Board and its committees. Substantial policy and technical work by staff is required. Over time staff will need to be realigned to provide support to the renewed advisory structure. This recognizes that there will need to be expanded resources to take on this increased scope of responsibility and that the ITAC Board will need to find ways to adequately resource the advisory structure.

Advisory Structure - The roles of the ITAC advisory structure are defined in the following sections.

Stakeholders - The advice-gathering process cannot stop at committees. ITAC has a responsibility to ensure and support its advisory structures to be able to reach out to their broader constituencies to obtain input and reflected in their eventual recommendations to ITAC (e.g. network of equity seeking individuals and organizations). ITAC’s stakeholders also need to feel that they can go directly to ITAC on important issues without usurping the mandate of ITAC’s formal advisory structures.

7.5 Proposed Structure

Before ITAC can consider how its advice-receiving function should be structured and who should be involved in this, it had to answer the fundamental question, what type of advice does it want from its advisory structure, and how should this structure operate?

What ITAC heard and believes it needs are two types of advice and recommendations, particularly from business and labour:

"strategic, policy level" advice - for example, strategic directions, major policy issues which affect one or more industries and/or a group of trades; significant public policy developments which affect the industry training and apprenticeship system overall; national and/or international trends which impact strategic policy and plans; major financial/funding issues; skill shortage projections; developments which affect all or many programs; etc.

"technical, operational policy level" advice - for example, skill profiles, curriculum development, learning materials, specific trade issues, etc.

Regarding how its advisory structure should operate, what ITAC heard is that there are good examples of existing advisory committees that are effective and which exemplify "best practices" and that ITAC has to support an advisory structure that builds on these practices and maximizes the use of the Internet and other technologies to enhance communications within and between the elements of ITAC’s advisory structure.

ITAC has developed a proposed structure for how its need for advice could be met. This is provided below.

7.5.1 Common Principles - All ITAC Advisory Structures

The following common principles refer to advisory "structures" and "groups" as ITAC’s advisory structures will include elements beyond formal, standing advisory committees, per se. This will extend to the use of electronic communications, consultations with ITAC partners, questionnaires, focus groups, etc.

Membership

To a large extent, the efficacy of the ITAC advisory structure will be measured by the degree to which it represents its broader constituencies (i.e. industry sectors, small business, colleges and institutes, under-represented groups, etc.). Therefore, ITAC cannot restrict its advice-gathering to structured committees; it must rely on other means such as consultations, industry associations, surveys, Internet, web sites, email, industry publications, etc., to obtain input on ITAC issues.

The membership on ITAC’s advisory structure will generally be based on ITAC’s four-cornered partnership model.

Advisory structure members will:

- be knowledgeable about and committed to supporting effective industry training and apprenticeship programs;

- reflect the diversity of the labour market and some members are from under-represented groups;

- have demonstrated leadership abilities, appropriate expertise and knowledge of the sector, region or trade for which they are being considered, and a proven track record of hiring and training apprentices and trainees; and

- where possible, reflect a balance of small and large businesses and of labour and management representatives.

All advisory structure membership lists will be on the ITAC web site.

Advisory structure size will be limited with a minimum and maximum number of members.

Linkages between the components of ITAC’s advisory structure

All records of advisory committee meetings will be posted on the ITAC web site.

A regular regional meeting of ITAC’s advisory structure and interested stakeholders will be held annually.

There will be clear lines of linkage and common membership among the various types of ITAC advisory groups.

Representatives of regional, local and/or trade/occupation advisory groups need to link with provincial and or industry-wide groups. ITAC will establish a place on the web site where outcomes and activities of each group can be posted for general information.

7.5.2 - ITAC Advisory Structure

The following describes the advisory structure under consideration by ITAC.

It proposes that there be trade or occupation groups and that over time a smaller number of committees than the current number of trade advisory committees be developed by combining trades/occupations with commonalties.

It proposes an ITAC Chairs Advisory Group to link cross trade/occupation and sector issues and to link with ITAC staff on key issues.

It maintains the existing College Program Advisory Committee structure, but with clear linkages, common membership and other enhancements with the express requirement for ITAC to work with them in determining the most appropriate advisory linkages.

It proposes the creation of an ITAC planning calendar regarding ITAC’s need for advice and consultation with its stakeholders on an ad hoc and regular basis. This would include annual stakeholder consultations including industry advisory groups, regional consultation meetings with interested stakeholders, a chairs committee to provide strategic policy level advice and technical advice as recommended from the trade/occupation advisory groups.

It recognizes that ITAC’s enhanced advisory structure will evolve over time and will be subject to a review process after three years to determine the efficacy of the enhanced ITAC Advisory Structure.

7.5.3 - ITAC Advisory Structure Schematic

ITAC Structure

 

i) PROVISION OF STRATEGIC ADVICE

ITAC Integrated Advisory Planning Framework

The introduction of an integrated planning framework involving increased consultation with business, labour, education and training providers, equity seeking individuals and organizations and other industry training and apprenticeship partners will assist ITAC in determining and setting its priorities.

In introducing consultation and advisory processes on the development of ITAC’s training plan, for example, strategic advice would be sought from the various partners, each contributing their unique perspective – employment initiatives and training plans from industry; priorities and unmet demand from the perspective of local communities, reflecting the views of under-represented labour force groups; and unmet demand and program offerings from the colleges/institutes.

This integrated advisory structure for obtaining strategic advice will include the use of industry and/or regional consultations, questionnaires, focus groups, electronic communications and any other mechanisms identified by ITAC that would assist in setting its strategic direction. ITAC will set clear direction regarding the nature and type of advice it will seek on an annual basis.

ITAC Industry Advisory Groups

Based on ITAC’s partnership model, industry by definition includes employer and employee representation. The intent of these groups is to ensure that the advice received is reflective of industry’s present and future needs. Those industries which have existing groups or structures willing to provide ITAC with advice will be considered for inclusion in ITAC’s advisory structure.

ITAC will hold consultations throughout the year, based on a planning calendar outlining the nature and type of advice sought by ITAC. Consultations may be both ad hoc and regular and will depend on the purpose of the consultations and the participants.

This is a new ITAC advisory structure that provides for key industry sectors to participate in ITAC policy development by making recommendations to the Board. There are other means for obtaining industry sector input on ITAC policy issues, however ITAC heard from industries such as construction, heavy industries, agriculture, and tourism on the need for providing formal mechanisms for this. In these industries, the proponents may wish to hold regular or semi-regular meetings to be positioned to respond to ITAC’s request for information and provide leadership. Other industries may choose to meet only as requested and on an ad hoc basis.

a) Industry Advisory Group Terms of Reference

The purpose of the groups is to provide ITAC with advice on strategic policy issues and planning industry training strategies.

ITAC industry advisory groups may wish to provide strategic policy advice and leadership including recommendations on the following matters to the appropriate ITAC Standing Committee and/or the ITAC CEO:

short and long term industry training needs

monitor and respond to ITAC on issues that may impact one’s industry

ensure the industry is well represented on other advisory groups

funding issues

new and innovative approaches to training

liaison with other industry advisory groups, Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups, etc.

liaison with college, institutes and private training providers

b) Industry Advisory Group Composition and Nomination Process

Where possible, ITAC’s industry advisory groups should reflect ITAC’s industry-driven nature and focus on a partnership model of business and labour representation. An example of such a group might be the Northern Interior Forest Training Initiative (NIFTI), which is composed of employer and employee representatives, from affected regions, who consulted with the former Apprenticeship Branch staff and Provincial Apprenticeship Board and now ITAC Staff and Board on innovative delivery methods for training Millwrights.

ITAC will consult with appropriate industry representatives on creating Industry Advisory Groups such as construction and heavy industries and identify the need or desire for other Industry Advisory Groups. Nominations for Industry Advisory Groups are managed by each industry and not by ITAC. ITAC will request that membership follow the ITAC partnership model, although it is ITAC’s intent to be flexible when considering a particular industry group’s request for establishment as part of the ITAC Advisory Structure.

ITAC will act as a catalyst in industries that have not established advisory groups and where it would be beneficial to do so.

c) Industry Advisory Group Operation

Industry advisory groups have their own reporting structures, however when they are making recommendations to ITAC, they are forwarded to the ITAC Board or Standing Committee, through the ITAC CEO. ITAC, through its CEO, may also solicit strategic policy advice from an Industry Advisory Group.

d) ITAC Staff Role in Industry Advisory Groups


ITAC staff will communicate a planning calendar outlining the nature and timing of ITAC requests to industry for advice. Industry advisory groups will resource themselves and will be responsible for administration of their groups’ meetings, meetings summaries, etc.

Regional Industry Advisory Consultations

ITAC heard during the consultation from many small businesses, industry groups and institutional staff and partners that it must have a mechanism for obtaining regional industry advice.

ITAC will take the lead in calling these consultations and will resource them when held and will make use of electronic communication, internet and other tools to initiate the consultations. Obtaining this advice must be driven by ITAC’s need for issue-specific advice that is timely and relevant to ITAC’s policy agenda. The consultations will be inclusive of all British Columbians with an interest and expertise in industry training and apprenticeship. Members of ITAC’s advisory structure would be consulted as well and would be welcome to attend regional industry advisory consultations.

ii) PROVISION OF TECHNICAL/OPERATIONAL ADVICE

Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups

This advisory structure would include trade/occupation advisory groups. Where possible and feasible to do so, trades/occupations will be consolidated with a view to reducing the current number of existing trade advisory committees. This will be achieved through the leadership and direction of industry. In the spirit of having a flexible model, not a "cookie cutter" approach, some trades/occupations lend themselves better to sector initiatives. ITAC will take advice from industry on which trades/occupations can be combined and the time that will be required to phase this in. The trade/occupation advisory groups will be key to ITAC obtaining technical advice.

a) Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups Terms of Reference

The ITAC trade/occupation advisory group is responsible for providing technical and operational advice and will include recommendations on the following matters:

trade or occupational standards

curriculum content entry level trades training and apprenticeship programs

qualifications for entry into an ITA program

qualifications and examinations for certification in the trade or occupation

the term of the program

the content and length of on-the-job and in-school training

journeyperson updating requirements of the trade or occupation

identification of labour market intelligence for the trade or occupation

new innovative or alternate methods of delivering training

such matters as may be requested by the ITAC CEO

b) Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups Composition

ITAC intends to support renewal, innovation and effectiveness in its advisory structure and composition.

Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups will be structured to consist of related trades/occupations, with commonalties. More than 50 per cent of the members must be from industry (business and labour) and business and labour representatives must be equal.

Business representatives

Labour representatives

Regional industry representatives from program advisory committees

Education representatives - Articulation chair, instructor representative, management representative, K-12 representative

Private training representative

Under-Represented Group representatives (may also represent other constituencies)

Other public agency representatives (e.g. WCB, Municipal inspector, etc.)

Apprentices/trainees in the trade or occupation

c) Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups Nomination Process & Terms of Appointment

Nominations for trade/occupation advisory groups would be managed by ITAC and submitted to the ITAC CEO by industry and other constituencies, as per the above

criteria. Guidelines will be communicated to all stakeholders when the advisory policy is implemented.

The Chairs of Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups shall be elected by the advisory group members. A Vice-Chair will be elected by the advisory group and will assume the Chair in the absence of the Chair or at the request of the Chair. If the Chair’s

position is held by business/management, then the Vice-Chair position shall be an employee representative, or vice-a-versa. Chair and Vice-Chair terms will be 2 years long and will include a review process.

ITAC trade/occupation advisory group members will be appointed for a term of up to 3 years, and may be re-appointed for additional terms.

d) Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups Operation

Trade/occupation advisory groups provide advice and make recommendations to the ITAC CEO, who determines whether they should be acted upon, require further input from other sources or additional staff review, should be referred to an ITAC standing committee or the ITAC Board or referred to another advisory group.

This structure would liaise closely with Program Advisory Committees (see below) on technical and operational issues, including having common representatives on both structures. The trade/occupation advisory groups may provide recommendations on cross-trade and sector issues to the ITAC Chairs Advisory Group (see below) which is responsible for providing operational policy advice to the ITAC Board and its standing committees.

Meetings will be held less frequently, but be longer (e.g. annual two day meeting, with non-traditional communication in-between). Urgent decisions can be dealt with by fax or conference call between meetings.

Use of technology—groups will be supported and encouraged by ITAC to use the Internet, email, web site, conference calls, and other means of communication and development of recommendations between face-to-face meetings. This will be particularly important for regional representatives and linking with regional groups.

Orientation for new members will occur by providing new members with written information along with their letter of appointment. It will be the responsibility of the advisory group chair to meet with the appointee and orient them on current issues and provide them with a status report on the work of the group.

ITAC will set the agenda for regular and periodic program reviews; staff will lead the review and advice will be sought from the advisory group chairs.

Scheduling of meetings will be done around the needs of industry.

All ITAC advisory group summaries of outcomes will be published on ITAC web site.

e) ITAC Staff Role in Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups

ITAC Program Coordinators and Field Staff manage the advisory process, undertake analysis and research, and make recommendations to the CEO or his/her designate vis-�-vis advisory recommendations.

Chairs’ Advisory Group

A group of representative Trade/Occupation Advisory Group chairs will form the Chairs’ Advisory Group. The existing Trade Advisory Committee Chairs Committee will act as this Group until the Advisory Structure is in place. ITAC will review the need for such an advisory group on an annual basis to determine if its role should be transitional, task-oriented or ongoing. Regardless, the ITAC Board plans to hold annual meetings with all Trade/Occupation Advisory Group Chairs.

a) Chairs’ Advisory Group Terms of Reference

to advise ITAC on operational policy issues and common technical issues;

to provide input to industry advisory groups;

to provide input to trade/occupation advisory groups;

to work with trade/occupation advisory groups in determining which industries could be combined in trade clusters and or sectoral groups; and

to identify and advise ITAC on common issues which run across trade/occupation advisory groups.

b) Chairs’ Advisory Group Composition and Nomination Process

The Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups recommend nominees to the ITAC CEO.

The ITAC CEO reviews the nominations and appoints 10 individuals for a period of up to three years, with staggered appointments. Membership would be reviewed each year. The group would be representative of the various trade/occupational areas, and its members would bring a broad perspective to this group.

c) Chairs’ Advisory Group Operation

The ITAC Chairs’ Advisory Group provides recommendations and advice to the ITAC CEO and staff on technical issues common to all or many trades/occupations and on issues that cut across trade areas. Based on direction from ITAC, the ITAC Chairs Advisory Group may be requested to provide advice on broad, strategic policy issues to the ITAC CEO and staff who would provide analysis and recommendations to the Board.

d) ITAC Staff Role in Chairs’ Advisory Group


ITAC staff will communicate a planning calendar outlining the nature and timing of ITAC requests to the Chairs’ Group for advice. The Chairs’ Advisory group will resource itself and will be responsible for administration of their groups’ meetings, meetings summaries, etc.

Program Advisory Committees

There is an existing advisory structure for ELTT programs in the colleges and institutes. While the College and Institute Act does not require institutions to create such committees, these are long-established structures. ITAC is not in a position to tell colleges how to manage their operations or advisory structures; but in the meantime, for programs that it funds (i.e. ELTT programs), ITAC can require that certain standards are met for industry input and linkages with other advisory structures.

Therefore, ITAC is proposing that it work with the college and institute system, Program Advisory Committees (PACs), Provincial Articulation Committees and MAETT to develop terms of reference, composition and linkages between ITAC and the colleges/institutes as it relates to ELTT programs. This will be an evolutionary process.

a) Program Advisory Committee Terms of Reference

Build on the existing Program Advisory Committee and Provincial Articulation Committees (see section 1 for a full discussion regarding the terms of references of these existing groups) and identify ways to link ITAC with other structures.

College PACs that exist for entry level trades training (ELTT) programs will provide advice to ITAC and communicate with ITAC on programs it funds.

College PACs will link with provincial articulation committees (Articulation Committees are organized and managed by the BC Council on Admissions and Transfer to facilitate dialogue and cooperation in the college system with regard to articulation between and among like programs). There will be two-way communication and input between trade/occupation advisory groups and individual PACs.

When a PAC has recommendations on specific trades, occupations or programs, it will provide those to ITAC and the appropriate trade/occupation advisory group.

College and institute research and planning regarding ELTT and apprenticeship programs should be coordinated through ITAC and not by individual colleges to result in a uniform approach and regionalization with consistency.

b) Program Advisory Committee Composition and Nomination Process

To be completed once the colleges/institutes, Ministry of Advanced Education Training and Technology and ITAC have determined the most appropriate linkages.

The Trade/Occupation Advisory Groups do not replace the Program Advisory Committees.

c) Program Advisory Committee Operation

To be completed once the colleges/institutes, Ministry of Advanced Education Training and Technology and ITAC have determined the most appropriate linkages.

In the short term, at a minimum, an appropriate Program Advisory Committee representative should participate on the trade/occupation advisory groups. Alternatively, an ITAC trade/occupation advisory group representative should participate on the PAC.

7.6 Accountability and Performance Indicators

In order to periodically evaluate the structure as part of the Commission’s accountability monitoring and reporting, performance indicators will be developed in the following areas:

Year 1

Review the ITAC Integrated Advisory Planning Framework and compare the plan to actual activity and results in 1999/2000.

Assess the degree to which the ITAC Integrated Advisory Planning Framework addresses ITAC’s strategic directions and mandate.

Evaluate the extent to which the new advisory structure has been implemented (e.g. new terms of reference for each group, new appointment process, new members).

Submit an annual report to stakeholders that describes the nature, type and scope of advice that is submitted to and sought by ITAC, specifying how and when stakeholder advice is linked to ITAC strategic and budget planning processes.

Complete a formative evaluation of the ITAC advisory structure after the first year.

Year 2

Implement recommendations of the first year evaluation.

Conduct a comparative review of the ITAC web site between year 1 and 2 in terms of the ITAC advisory structure page (e.g. description of structure, membership lists, meeting summaries, etc.)

Review the ITAC Integrated Advisory Planning Framework and compare the plan to actual activity and results in 2000/01.

Submit an annual report to stakeholders that describes the nature, type and scope of advice that is submitted to and sought by ITAC, specifying how and when stakeholder advice is linked to ITAC strategic and budget planning processes.

Year 3

Complete a full evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of the ITAC advisory structure.

Implement recommendations in year 4.

8. NEXT STEPS

This policy paper will be distributed to ITAC stakeholders in early October. The planned critical path is as follows:

By September 30th - Approval by ITAC Board.

By October 2-5th - Distribute paper on proposed policy to stakeholders and post on the ITAC web site.

December, 1998 - Meetings with stakeholders and receipt of responses and feedback.

By December 30th - Finalize and communicate final policy.

January - March, 1999 - Phased implementation, including calls for nominations.

April 1 - June 30, 1999 - Completion of Implementation

8.1 Implementation Strategy

Once feedback is received on this policy paper, ITAC will finalize and implement its new advisory structure. When this is communicated publicly in the fall, which will include a significant communications process aimed at all stakeholders, ITAC will provide specific steps and procedures regarding the transition from existing to new, including information on the nominations process, direction and terms of reference.

The new structure will be phased in, in consultation with ITAC stakeholders and participants in its existing advisory structures, for example:

the existing Chairs’ Advisory Committee will be consulted on the areas where groups of trades/occupations may be combined into a broader trade/occupation advisory group.

the existing Trade Advisory Committees will be asked to nominate a member to represent the TAC on Program Advisory Committees and vice a versa

stakeholders will be called upon to indicate their desire to establish industry advisory groups.

college/institutes, MAETT and ITAC will determine most appropriate linkages, composition, terms of reference on how Program Advisory Committees can best serve the ITAC advisory process.

ITAC will challenge its partners—particularly business, labour and education groups—and existing advisory committees to move in a timely manner to the new structure. Specific timelines for the transition will be provided following consultation between ITAC staff and existing advisory groups. It is ITAC’s intention that this will be an evolving process where existing structures will continue to be in place until the new structure is operational in order that policy and operational priorities do not fall between the cracks.

Document dated:  October 1, 1998


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Placed on site:  October 9, 1998 by Dan B
� 1998, Industry Training and Apprenticeship Commission